Adults with learning disabilities who live in their own home

We know that appropriate accommodation for people with learning disabilities has a strong impact on their safety and overall quality of life, while also reducing social exclusion. However, many people with a learning disability do not get a choice about where they live or who they live with (NHS Digital, 2015).

What proportion of adults with learning disabilities live at home?

In 2007, a government report, Valuing People Now, set out a three year strategy to support adults with learning disabilities to live fuller lives. This report highlighted issues with housing and that 'many people with learning disabilities – unlike the rest of the population – do not choose where they live or with whom; and more than half live with their families, and most of the remainder live in residential care'.

Here, we look at the proportion of adults with learning disabilities who live in their own home or with their families. The proportion of people with a learning disability living at home increased to from 70% in 2011-12 to 75.4% in 2015-16.

Updated November 2016.

How does the proportion of people with learning disabilities living in their own home vary across England?

In 2015-16, there was large variation between different regions in England in terms of the proportion of people with learning disabilities living in their own home or with their family. This was highest in the North West (89%) and lowest the in West Midlands (68%) - a 21 percentage point difference.

Updated November 2016.

About this data

This measure was formerly NI 145 in the National Indicator Set. However, a change to the definition of the data used to populate this measure occurred in 2011-12. This change allowed councils to include service users in the numerator as long as their accommodation status had been 'captured or confirmed' during 2011-12. Previously, the accommodation status had to have been recorded at assessment or review. This change should be kept in mind when comparing 2011-12 and 2012-13 data with data from 2010-11.

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