Carer-reported quality of life

There are currently 6.5 million people caring in the UK. Without the right support, the personal cost to carers can be high (Carers UK, 2013) . In 2010, the Government launched next steps for the carers strategy to continue to recognise and value this ongoing contribution of carers.

How has carer quality of life changed over time?

In 2010, the next steps for the Carers strategy set out the aim for 'carers to be able to have a life of their own alongside their caring role'. To explore whether this is happening, we can look at carer-reported quality of life using the Survey of Adult Carers. For details on how this score is calculated please see 'about this data' below.

The average carer-reported quality of life score has decreased slightly across the country from 8.1 in 2012-13 to 7.9 in 2015-16. There is regional variation in the reported quality of life score. In 2015-16, the North East reported the highest quality of life scores (8.5) and London the worst (7.6). Male carers had an average score of 8.1 in England, which is 0.3 points higher than females who scored 7.8 (data not shown).

Updated November 2016.

How does carer quality of life vary by age group?

Nationally, carers over the age of 65 reported higher quality of life scores (8.1) than those aged 18-64 (7.6) in 2015-2016. The extent to which this differs varied across the country. In Yorkshire and the Humber, there was a 0.2 point difference, while in the East Midlands there was a 0.7 point difference in score.

Updated November 2016.

About this data

There are currently 6.5 million people caring in the UK and we know that, without the right support, the personal cost to carers can be high (Carers UK, 2013). The Government launched the Care Act 2014 to continue to recognise and value this ongoing contribution of carers.

The quality of life of carers is based on a number of the most important outcomes identified by carers themselves to which adult social care contributes.  

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