Community mental health care reviews

Once a mental health care plan has been agreed, it is important for service users to have regular review meetings with their care coordinator to ensure that it continues to meet their needs. Involving people in their own care is essential as research has shown that it can lead to more effective decision-making and better health outcomes. The NICE quality standard for service user experience in adult mental health services states that service users should feel actively involved in making decisions about their care and treatment. This indicator uses data from the Community Mental Health Survey which asks a sample of service users from each trust several questions about their experiences.

Do community mental health service users have regular care review meetings?

Since 2014, service users have been asked whether they have had a formal meeting with someone from NHS mental health services to discuss how their care was working in the last 12 months. Prior to that, people were asked whether they had a care review meeting to discuss their care in the last 12 months. A greater proportion of service users reported that they had a care review meeting after the question was reworded. In 2017, 72% of respondents stated that they had a formal meeting with someone from NHS mental health services to discuss their care in the last 12 months.

Updated January 2018.

How involved do people feel in discussions about how their care is working?

The Community Mental Health Survey asks service users who had a care review meeting in the last 12 months if they were involved as much as they wanted to be in discussing how their care was working. In 2017, 92% of people felt that they were involved in discussions about their care. This was a slight decrease from 93% in 2014. Meanwhile, 90% of respondents felt that in the care review meeting decisions had been made together by themselves and the NHS mental health services worker (data not shown).

Updated January 2018.

About this data

The Community Mental Health Survey is sent to a random sample of service users from each trust aged 18 and over who received specialist care or treatment for a mental health condition within a specified time period.

The survey asks people about their overall care, crisis care, access and coordination of care, patient involvement, medicines and additional support.

Respondents who stated that they did not know/could not remember are excluded from the survey results. To enable national comparison between years, data is weighted to account for differences in response rates between trusts. A further weighting accounts for differences in response rates at a given trust in a given year, across age groups or gender. Respondents who stated that they had been in contact with mental health services for less than a year were removed from the base for these questions. Respondents who stated that they did not want to be involved in their care were also removed.

The Community Mental Health Survey underwent two major redevelopments in 2010 and 2014 to revise its methodology and questionnaire content to reflect changes in policy and best practice.

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