Post-discharge information

To understand the quality of services that the NHS delivers, it is important to understand what people think about their care and treatment. It is also important that service users should be involved in and informed of the care and treatment they receive. The outpatient and inpatient surveys contain a number of questions around the information patients are provided with when leaving hospital.

How has the proportion of inpatients warned about medication side effects to watch for on discharge changed?

A substantial proportion (41% in 2015) of inpatients asked, said that they were not told about medication side effects to watch for once they went home. There has been no statistically significant difference in experience when comparing the proportion of respondents who said they were completely informed of the side effects between 2005 and 2014, but there was a statistically significant increase between 2010 (37%) and 2014 (39%). No significant change was seen in 2015.

Updated August 2016.

How did the proportion of outpatients warned about medication side effects to watch for change to 2011?

The proportion of outpatients who reported not being warned about potential medication side effects decreased from 39% in 2003 to 36% in 2011. However, 57% of outpatients reported not being completely warned about medication side effects to watch out for in 2011. In general the proportion of patients being completely warned about medication side effects to watch for was higher for outpatients than inpatients.

The outpatient survey ceased in 2011.

How has the proportion of inpatients warned of danger signals on discharge changed?

There has been a statistically significant increase in the proportion of respondents who were told about danger signals to watch for after discharge from hospital. The proportion who felt they were completely informed increased from 39% in 2005 to 44% in 2014, where it remained in 2015. One-fifth were informed to some extent, whilst 35% were not warned about the danger signals at all.

Updated August 2016.

How did the proportion of outpatients warned of danger signals change to 2011?

The proportion of outpatients who reported not being warned about danger signals upon returning home decreased from 36% in 2003 to 33% in 2011. However, 54% of outpatients reported not being completely warned about danger signals to watch out for in 2011. In general the proportion of patients being completely warned about danger signals was higher for outpatients than inpatients.

The outpatient survey ceased in 2011.

How has the proportion of inpatients informed of who to contact in case of any concern on discharge changed?

There was a statistically significant increase in the proportion of respondents who were told by staff who to contact if they had any worries about their condition or treatment after discharge. This increased from 76% in 2005 to 78% in 2014, where it remained in 2015.

Updated August 2016.

How did the proportion of outpatients informed of who to contact in case of any concern change to 2011?

The proportion of outpatients who reported not being informed of who to contact in case of any concern with their condition or treatment upon returning home increased from 62% in 2004 to 66% in 2011. In general the proportion of patients being informed of who to contact in case of any concern is lower for outpatients than inpatients.

The outpatient survey ceased in 2011.

About this data

These indicators draw on data from the Adult Inpatient Survey and the Outpatient Survey (which was discontinued in 2011).

The results from 2005-14 were taken from analysis undertaken in November 2015 on the trends over the period. To enable fairer comparisons between years, data was standardised to account for demographic differences in respondents. All data points were adjusted to the age, gender and admission route profile of respondents in 2014. 2015 results are standardised to the demographic profile of 2015 in terms of age/sex/route of admission. This is acceptable when comparing year-on-year results because of the relatively limited annual change in the demographic profile of the overall set of respondents. However, over longer periods, the small annual changes accumulate and need to be taken into account, and further standardisation needs to be applied (see more).

The results (percentages) from each provider are given equal weight in calculating the England results. Some providers have a higher response rate than others and would therefore have a greater influence over the England average.

To correct this, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) applies a ‘weight’ to the data. As a result of applying this weight, the responses from each provider have an equal influence over the England average, regardless of differences in response rates between providers.

Results (percentages) are presented from CQC's national reports and have been rounded up or down to whole numbers. If two response categories are added together (such as ‘very good’ and ’good’), the resulting figure will be slightly different to the figures reported elsewhere, because these used results to at least two decimal places. Likewise, columns may not add up to exactly 100% due to the rounding.

For more information please see NHS Surveys: Current surveys, Previous surveys

Comments

Add new comment