Carers' views of social care quality

Carers are a key part of social care services. The carers’ survey was developed to learn more about whether services are helping them in their caring role and life outside of caring, and about their perception of services provided to the cared-for person.

How do carers feel about their involvement in discussions on the social care the person they care for receives?

There is regional variation in the proportion of carers who felt involved in discussions about the social care the person they care for received. The East Midlands had the lowest proportion of carers who always or usually felt involved or consulted in 2014-15, at 46.5%. This is 17.2 percentage points below the highest level, seen in the North East, and 7.8 percentage points below the national average of 54.3%. The responses included those who said that no discussions had happened in the previous 12 months.
The data from 2009-10 was not aggregated in regional groups, so they are not included here. More than half of regions reported lower proportions of carers feeling involved in discussions in 2014-15 than 2012-13.

How has the proportion of carers feeling involved changed by age?

Carers aged 55-64 most felt (55.9%) they had been involved or consulted as much as they wanted to be, in discussions about the support or services provided to the person they care for. The proportion of carers who felt consulted dropped between 2012-13 and 2014-15 for all age groups other than those aged 35-44, which increased 2.5 percentage points to 54.5%.

How has the proportion of carers finding it easy to access information varied by region?

The proportion of carers who found it very or fairly easy to access information decreased across every region from 2012-13 to 2014-15. The South West saw the largest decrease, falling 6.1 percentage points to 61.6%. This is 11.6 percentage points below the highest, seen in the North East, and 1.8 below the national average of 63.4%.

How has the proportion of carers finding it easy to access information by age changed?

In each survey since 2009-10 there has been a decrease in the proportion of carers who found it easy to access information on support in all age groups other than those aged 25-34. In 2014-15 the group of carers who had the lowest proportion of positive responses when asked about the ease of finding information were those aged 35-44. After this, the proportion of carers who reported finding it easy to find information increases with age to a peak of 71.3% in those aged over 85.

About this data

This questionnaire was initially conducted as a pilot in 2009-10 where councils could voluntarily take part. Ninety out of 152 took part compared to 151 of 152 in 2012-13 and 152 in 2014-15 when the questionnaire was compulsory.

In 2009-10 a sample of 88,000 carers out of an eligible population of 176,000 was selected and sent questionnaires, of which 35,000 responded to the survey - a response rate of 40%. In 2012-13, 57,810 people out of a sample of 125,950 carers responded to the survey, which is a response rate of 46%. In 2014-15, 57,380 out of a sample of 131,105 carers responded to the survey, which is a response rate of 44% (down two percentage points from 2012-13). In 2009-10, the data was not aggregated in regional groups, so only data from the last two years is included. 

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