Social care users and safety

The Personal Adult Social Care Survey asks people over 18 who use services wholly or partly funded by social services about their experiences, to understand whether services are helping people to live safely and independently.

What proportion of people feel their service makes them feel safe?

The Care and Support White Paper states that a high-quality service must be one which keeps people safe from harm and it is important that care and support services help vulnerable groups feel safe. In 2014-15 and 2015-16, this was high, at 85%. Again, the changes to the methodology create a break in the time series in 2014-15 so direct comparison to previous years is not possible.

Updated September 2016.

How has the proportion of social care users who feel safe changed?

The Personal Adult Social Care Survey asks users how safe they feel. The proportion of people who felt as safe as they wanted to in 2014-15 was 68.5%, leaving 31.5% who didn't feel as safe as they wanted to in that year. In 2015-16 a slightly higher percentage felt safe at 69.2%. In addition to this, 25.3% of care users in 2015-16 said they felt adequately safe, but not as safe as they would like (data not shown).

The changes to the methodology create a break in the time series in 2014-15 and direct comparison to previous years is not possible.

Updated September 2016.

About this data

There have been a number of changes to the survey methodology for 2014/15. The most important changes to note are:

• The population covered by the survey now includes only those in receipt of long-term support services; those in receipt of low-level support only (such as equipment and adaptations, professional support, or short-term residential care) are not included in the survey population or sample.

• The population covered by the survey now includes those service users who receive support from CASSRs in terms of assessment and care management but who pay in full for the cost of their services (full cost clients); previously service users were included only where the CASSR made a contribution towards the costs of services received.

• The methodology used to weight the results has been enhanced to improve the accuracy of the estimates presented.

Because of these changes, it is not possible to make direct comparisons between data for 2014/15 and previous years.

For further information, please see NHS Digital

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